Overcoming Sensory Issues at the Dentist – 5 Top Tips for Parents of Special Needs Children

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Going to the dentist can be an overwhelming experience for special needs children, especially those with sensory issues. When a child displays symptoms of a sensory processing disorder, bright lights, loud noises, tastes, and smells can cause feelings of anxiety at the dentist.

I have been practicing family dentistry for seventeen years and have discovered ways of overcoming sensory issues at the dentist for parents and children. Dental care is important, so having children become comfortable when visiting the dentist is vital to their health and well-being.

 

#1: Preparing at Home

Finding ways at home to prepare for a child’s appointment is an excellent start for him or her to approach overcoming sensory issues at the dentist. Parents can role-play a dentist appointment, read storybooks, and watch videos about dental checkups so their child can see what a dental visit will be like.

Role-playing a dentist appointment is a great way for overcoming sensory issues at the dentist because it allows children to practice laying down with their feet out, keeping their hands on their stomach, and opening their mouths wide. These actions familiarize them with the movements and feelings that come with visiting the dentist.

Storybooks and videos can help by creating a visual image of the dentist. Visuals are fantastic because they allow a child to make connections between the dentist and the videos they watch or stories they read.

 

#2: Working With Office and Staff Members

As a dentist, it’s always my goal to make sure my patients are as comfortable as possible. Dental staff members will usually be more than willing to work with a parent and their special needs child on overcoming their sensory issues.

 

#3: Visiting the Office Beforehand

One great thing that many dental offices offer is desensitization appointments. These appointments are scheduled before the actual dental checkup and allow a parent and child to see the office and meet the staff. This is of particular value for a special needs child because familiarity goes a long way toward comfort.

 

#4: Special Accommodations

Parents can also work with staff members to coordinate any special accommodations that their child might need. For example, if there is a toothpaste flavor that their child favors, they can arrange to have that flavor ready and waiting on the day of the child’s visit.

 

#5: Finding Distractions

Distractions are an important part of overcoming sensory issues at the dentist that a special needs child might face. They provide the child with something new to focus on instead of worrying about what is happening inside their mouth. If a child has a favorite toy or “fidget item”, they should bring it to the appointment as well.

Another great distraction is a movie or television show that a child enjoys. Many dental offices have a screen available, but if not, parents can bring an iPad or portable DVD player. During the appointment, the child can focus on what is on the screen rather than the noises and feelings surrounding their mouth.

When working with their children towards overcoming sensory issues at the dentist, there are a number of things parents can do both before and during the appointment to help ensure a positive experience. As a dentist, I’ve found that the level of parent preparation directly correlates with the level (or lack!) of anxiety experienced by my special needs child patients.

 

 

About the writer: Dr. Greg Grillo (dentably.com)

I have been practicing family dentistry for seventeen years and have discovered ways parents and children can overcome their sensory issues surrounding a dental visit. Dental care is important, so having a child become comfortable when visiting the dentist is vital to their health and well-being. Visit dentably.com for more information.

 

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